Restaurants Cheltenham

MONTY’S BRASSERIE,

THE GEORGE HOTEL

Cheltenham is a spa town, of course, which means it’s full of Regency architecture. Monty’s Brasserie, attached to the

George Hotel, is in a building of this style. It’s not far from the town centre, and quite possible to happen upon quickly if

you neglected to memorise your map. Regency architecture tends towards the rectangular.

Tall buildings, although not a great number of storeys – high ceilings with tall windows. At Monty’s, when we lunched on a Friday, these sash windows remain. They were open, all along the front wall, which immediately impressed a comfortable and solid confidence upon me. A busy enough road and tributaries are visible from the windowside tables, though the brasseries is et back from the road, and avenue trees stand closer than vehicles pass. From my position, a lime and a sumac (both trees from which edible liquids can be extracted, by the by) were in my eyeline. These large, sturdy trees add to the ambiance — they’ve had as long as they’ve needed to grow, and you have as long as you need to eat. Not true, actually — we were allotted a two-hour limit. But the sense of leisure remained. I started with a pea and ham risotto. Auspicious! It was wonderfully balanced, with just enough salt that I could appreciate it was delicious and just little enough salt to prevent this course from satisfying me. I don’t mean I found it lacking. It exemplified the concept of “a starter”. It was the hare running past the greyhounds of my tastebuds. After this dish, I was so ready for my main. I’m quite taken with risotto as a restaurant starter. At home a risotto is good for a main, or eaten out including feature elements like mussels — but a s a main, pea and ham (for example), would be dull. Risotto is a one-pot dish. As a starter, like I say, it worked a treat. Self-similar enough to pique my interest and start my palate looking around for more/ My dining companion chose crispy duck, which came in component form like a miniature banquet. Again — delightful, and an excellent approach to reminding the diner that they’re not supposed to be full yet. I’ve seen mains returned practically whole, after an over-zealous starter.
next next
Click next to continue reading
glos.info Website glos.info Website
©  glos.info   2014, 2015
Restaurants Cheltenham

MONTY’S BRASSERIE 

           THE GEORGE HOTEL

Cheltenham is a spa town, of course,  which means it’s full of Regency  architecture. Monty’s Brasserie, attached  to the George Hotel, is in a building of  this style. It’s not far from the town  centre, and quite possible to happen  upon quickly if you neglected to  memorise your map. Regency  architecture tends towards the  rectangular. Tall buildings, although not a great  number of storeys – high ceilings with  tall windows. At Monty’s, when we  lunched on a Friday, these sash windows  remain. They were open, all along the  front wall, which immediately impressed  a comfortable and solid confidence upon  me. A busy enough road and tributaries are  visible from the windowside tables,  though the brasseries is et back from the  road, and avenue trees stand closer than  vehicles pass. From my position, a lime  and a sumac (both trees from which  edible liquids can be extracted, by the  by) were in my eyeline. These large,  sturdy trees add to the ambiance —  they’ve had as long as they’ve needed to  grow, and you have as long as you need  to eat. Not true, actually — we were  allotted a two-hour limit. But the sense of  leisure remained.  I started with a pea and ham risotto.  Auspicious! It was wonderfully balanced,  with just enough salt that I could  appreciate it was delicious and just little  enough salt to prevent this course from  satisfying me. I don’t mean I found it  lacking. It exemplified the concept of “a  starter”. It was the hare running past the  greyhounds of my tastebuds. After this  dish, I was so ready for my main.  I’m quite taken with risotto as a  restaurant starter. At home a risotto is  good for a main, or eaten out including  feature elements like mussels — but a s  a main, pea and ham (for example),  would be dull. Risotto is a one-pot dish.  As a starter, like I say, it worked a treat.  Self-similar enough to pique my interest  and start my palate looking around for  more/ My dining companion chose  crispy duck, which came in component  form like a miniature banquet. Again —  delightful, and an excellent approach to  reminding the diner that they’re not  supposed to be full yet. I’ve seen mains  returned practically whole, after an over-   zealous starter.
next next glos.info Website glos.info Website
©  glos.info   2014, 2015