Restaurants Cheltenham glos.info Website glos.info Website

Koloshi    Fine Dining Indian Restaurant & Bar

Before I start this review, please join me in a moment of silence. I’m in mourning for a meal which I will never, quite precisely, eat again. I’ll surely eat in this restaurant again, and I may well order the same dishes. But you can never truly recapture a moment, can you? Koloshi restaurant is a little out of the way--three miles, or a ten-pound taxi fare, from the centre of Cheltenham. If you’re approaching by car or coming in from a different location, you should have no trouble. If you’re walking from town, good for you! We actually walked back to town, after a tremendously satisfying, filling, meal, and it was just the ticket. But that is a choice that is not for everyone. A little bird told me that Koloshi used to offer post-meal taxi fare payment. That’s something you may wish to ask after.
The images seen on the website are taken from the carpark, which is on the  opposite side of the restaurant from the road. (The website, incidentally, is quite bad--clicking on the “menu” tab will take you to a 404. You need to select from  the drop-down which appears when you hover over the menu tab, rather than  clicking on the tab itself.)     Koloshi is wheelchair accessible and recommended by the Michelin guide, as  well as having been awarded a certificate of excellence from TripAdvsior for the  past three years. The architecture is surprisingly atmospheric: while it looks  fairly roadside-average from the outside, once your make your way indoors the  low ceiling and wide dining area, with the bar inset against the first half of the  back wall, create a spacious intimacy that compliments the choices of art, and  decorated panels behind the bar. There’s an unprecedented amount of room  between each table, with comfortable seating (including sofa areas on corner  seats, with cushions set about to support your dining posture) that even looks  attractive to other diners, from behind. The space allows servers to navigate the  room with ease, which means the heavier cookware and serving dishes, such as  the copper bowl my main course came (and was assumably cooked) in, aren’t a  daunting prospect, and it lets a meal eaten amongst groups of strangers feel  private, relaxed, and secure. The large windows visible in the picture above are  curtained with a peachy gauze, which warms the light even on a frosty, drizzling  day... like the one of my visit.
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©  glos.info   2014, 2015
Restaurants Cheltenham glos.info Website glos.info Website
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KOLOSHI 
Before I start this review, please join me in a moment of silence. I’m in  mourning for a meal which I will never, quite precisely, eat again.  I’ll surely eat in this restaurant again, and I may well order the same  dishes. But you can never truly recapture a moment, can you? Koloshi restaurant is a little out of the way--three miles, or a ten-pound  taxi fare, from the centre of Cheltenham. If you’re approaching by car or  coming in from a different location, you should have no trouble. If you’re  walking from town, good for you! We actually walked back to town, after a  tremendously satisfying, filling, meal, and it was just the ticket. But that is  a choice that is not for everyone. A little bird told me that Koloshi used to  offer post-meal taxi fare payment. That’s something you may wish to ask  after.
The images seen on the website are taken from the carpark, which is on the  opposite side of the restaurant from the road. (The website, incidentally, is  quite bad--clicking on the “menu” tab will take you to a 404. You need to  select from the drop-down which appears when you hover over the menu tab,  rather than clicking on the tab itself.)       Koloshi is wheelchair accessible and recommended by the Michelin guide,  as well as having been awarded a certificate of excellence from TripAdvsior  for the past three years. The architecture is surprisingly atmospheric: while it  looks fairly roadside-average from the outside, once your make your way  indoors the low ceiling and wide dining area, with the bar inset against the  first half of the back wall, create a spacious intimacy that compliments the  choices of art, and decorated panels behind the bar. There’s an  unprecedented amount of room between each table, with comfortable seating  (including sofa areas on corner seats, with cushions set about to support your  dining posture) that even looks attractive to other diners, from behind. The  space allows servers to navigate the room with ease, which means the heavier  cookware and serving dishes, such as the copper bowl my main course came  (and was assumably cooked) in, aren’t a daunting prospect, and it lets a meal  eaten amongst groups of strangers feel private, relaxed, and secure. The large  windows visible in the picture above are curtained with a peachy gauze,  which warms the light even on a frosty, drizzling day... like the one of my  visit.
©  glos.info   2014, 2015